Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (UK Magazine) #1

Background

When the Disney buyout of Marvel happened in 2009, I can imagine that things were a bit up-in-the-air for the various license holders – particularly for those who were creating their own stories overseas.

Panini Magazines were among the most affected. At the time of the acquisition, Panini were publishing three different out-of-continuity Marvel magazines from their UK office.

That last title was terminated with issue #66 in 2011, but we pick it up again here with issue #1 when it was reborn in 2013 as "Spider-Man and his Amazing Friends".

Story 'Spider-Man vs. The Lizard'

  Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (UK Magazine) #1
Summary: 17-Jul-2013
Publisher: Panini Magazines
Editor: Simon Frith
Designer: Alex Foot, Charlotte Harvey

The story in this magazine is a greatly simplified retelling of Amazing Spider-Man (Vol. 1) #6 in 18 panels (or 8 pages).

  1. Peter Parker reads about a lizard, and persuades Jonah to send him to the swamp to get photos.
  2. Spider-Man meets a woman who says the Lizard is her transformed husband, Dr. Curtis Connors.
  3. Spider-Man makes an antidote and (during a fight) pours it into the Lizard's mouth.
  4. Peter takes a photo back to Jonah who says it is a fake and rips it up.

This is how the original story also ended – with Jonah tearing up the photos after Peter explains that he "brought [the photo] from an old Indian guide [he] met at the edge of the Everglades".

However, this retelling lacks that "bought it from an old Indian" detail, which makes the conclusion seem far less convincing.

General Comments

The remainder of the 32 pages includes filler material such as fact-files, coloring pages, and puzzles including mazes. There's a "fan art" page (which becomes a letters page in later issues), and a center-fold poster.

Overall Rating

To quote from Prime of Miss Jean Brodie:

"For those who like that sort of thing," said Miss Brodie in her best Edinburgh voice, "That is the sort of thing they like."

This magazine is for independent readers aged perhaps 6-8 years old. It's bright and colorful, and provides a pre-masticated retelling of a classic story.

Three Webs.

Footnote

Can I say "masticated" in a kids-rated review?